State of Contrast

 Defining Texas Art in simple terms is like attempting to define the state itself. Just as there is no one Texas - Texas experience, culture, landscape, aesthetic - there is no singular quality that encompasses the artwork produced by Texas. The state is as diverse and wide-ranging as the people it embraces and landscapes they populate. With pine trees to the east, deserts to the west, plains to the north, and the valley and gulf to the south, it remains a region steeped in contrast and contradiction. State of Contrast, a group exhibition curated by Kinzelman Art and Foltz Fine Art, celebrates the communion of a classic vision of Texas with modern sensibility, nodding to Early Texas art and artists while paving a path for new perspectives. 

 

A point of divergent cultures and landscapes, the region has fostered its population together for over 150 years. With art continuously evolving alongside history, it is evident that many artists in State of Contrast draw inspiration from Texas masters of the early twentieth century in their subject matter or style. From the rugged Big Bend Country found in paintings by Mary Baxter and David Caton, to the idyllic plains of the Gulf Coast depicted by Ken Mazzu, each capture a particular combination of beauty, richness and determined independence that is uniquely Texan. Furthermore, a number of works exhibited hone in on more specific historical events and landscapes, such as Arthur Dealty’s instantly recognizable urban snapshots and the distinctly native Texas wildlife rendered in Malou Flato’s nostalgic paintings. 

 

 In viewing artists as cultural barometers on the forefront of shifts occurring across our state and society at large, the diversity represented in State of Contrast demonstrates the innate strength binding us together, even as life in the twenty-first century seems to be rapidly changing. Walking through the exhibition, it is apparent that present-day Texas is a stark contrast to what it was 50 years ago. Our rural origins are often overlooked, yet many artists such as Pat Gabriel and Susu Meyer seek refuge in those places. These paintings serve as a reminder that not too far from our growing and bustling cities, we can rediscover the essence of what makes Texas so extraordinary. Although it’s important to look ahead and grow within our society, it is equally vital to recognize and embrace our roots.  

 

On view at the Bank of America Center Lobby @ 700 Lousiana Street

Monday-friday, 9-5pm 

This exhibition is organized by Kinzelman Art Consulting on behalf of MM Properties. For additional information about the exhibition, please call Kinzelman Art Consulting at 713.533.9923 or visit 

www.kinzelmanart.com

 

Abandoned Loading Dock

Mary Baxter

Abandoned Loading Dock

acrylic on polyfiber

36 x 32 in

Roadside Cliffs, 2018

Jeri Salter

Roadside Cliffs, 2018

pastel on board

18 x 24 in

Bell Park, Girl's 15th, 2018

Arthur Deatly

Bell Park, Girl's 15th, 2018

acrylic on canvas

24 x 30 in

Jefferson County #2, 2015-18

Ken Mazzu

Jefferson County #2, 2015-18

oil on canvas

50 x 70 in

Dogwood, 2019

Malou Flato

Dogwood, 2019

acrylic on Japanese paper mounted on canvas

40 x 30 in

Lap of the Earth, 2017

Janet Eager Krueger

Lap of the Earth, 2017

oil on canvas

36 x 40 in

Ocotillo

Mary Baxter

Ocotillo

oil on polyfiber

24 x 20 in

Colorado Canyon, Big Bend Ranch State Park, 2018

David Caton

Colorado Canyon, Big Bend Ranch State Park, 2018

oil on canvas

48 x 48 in

Spaghetti Warehouse, 2018

Arthur Deatly

Spaghetti Warehouse, 2018

acrylic on canvas

22 x 28 in

Cloud Nine, 2018

Jim Malone

Cloud Nine, 2018

Marker pen, spray paint, gold leaf

21 x 23 in

Creek Bubbles, 2019

Malou Flato

Creek Bubbles, 2019

acrylic on Japanese paper mounted on canvas

40 x 40 in

Room with a View, 2017

Pat Gabriel

Room with a View, 2017

oil on canvas

52 x 70 in

No Place to Hide II , 2013

William Montgomery

No Place to Hide II , 2013

oil on canvas

32 x 40 in

Leon County, 2018

Susu Meyer

Leon County, 2018

oil on canvas

40 x 44 in

Thanks for Being Me, 2016

Jim Malone

Thanks for Being Me, 2016

mixed media

32 x 40 in

Untitled, 2016

Richard Stout

Untitled, 2016

acrylic on canvas

60 x 40 in

Hot Springs Canyon Morning #3, Big Bend, 2018

David Caton

Hot Springs Canyon Morning #3, Big Bend, 2018

oil on canvas

48 x 48 in

Allen's Landing After the Construction, 2017

Arthur Deatly

Allen's Landing After the Construction, 2017

acrylic on canvas

36 x 60 in

Watching the Tree Line, San Jacinto, 2019

Ken Mazzu

Watching the Tree Line, San Jacinto, 2019

oil on canvas

50 x 70 in

Two Moons (Atascosa County, TX) , 2019

Susu Meyer

Two Moons (Atascosa County, TX) , 2019

oil on canvas

40 x 40 in

Bonnie Brae, 2018

Richard Stout

Bonnie Brae, 2018

acrylic on canvas

36 x 48 in

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State of Contrast
Defining Texas Art in simple terms is like attempting to define the state itself. Just as there is no one Texas - Texas experience, culture, landscape, aesthetic - there is no singular quality that encompasses the artwork produced by Texas. The state is as diverse and wide-ranging as the people it embraces and landscapes they populate. With pine trees to the east, deserts to the west, plains to the north, and the valley and gulf to the south, it remains a region steeped in contrast and contradiction. State of Contrast, a group exhibition curated by Kinzelman Art and Foltz Fine Art, celebrates the communion of a classic vision of Texas with modern sensibility, nodding to Early Texas art and artists while paving a path for new perspectives. A point of divergent cultures and landscapes, the region has fostered its population together for over 150 years. With art continuously evolving alongside history, it is evident that many artists in State of Contrast draw inspiration from Texas masters of the early twentieth century in their subject matter or style. From the rugged Big Bend Country found in paintings by Mary Baxter and David Caton, to the idyllic plains of the Gulf Coast depicted by Ken Mazzu, each capture a particular combination of beauty, richness and determined independence that is uniquely Texan. Furthermore, a number of works exhibited hone in on more specific historical events and landscapes, such as Arthur Dealty’s instantly recognizable urban snapshots and the distinctly native Texas wildlife rendered in Malou Flato’s nostalgic paintings. In viewing artists as cultural barometers on the forefront of shifts occurring across our state and society at large, the diversity represented in State of Contrast demonstrates the innate strength binding us together, even as life in the twenty-first century seems to be rapidly changing. Walking through the exhibition, it is apparent that present-day Texas is a stark contrast to what it was 50 years ago. Our rural origins are often overlooked, yet many artists such as Pat Gabriel and Susu Meyer seek refuge in those places. These paintings serve as a reminder that not too far from our growing and bustling cities, we can rediscover the essence of what makes Texas so extraordinary. Although it’s important to look ahead and grow within our society, it is equally vital to recognize and embrace our roots. On view at the Bank of America Center Lobby @ 700 Lousiana Street Monday-friday, 9-5pm This exhibition is organized by Kinzelman Art Consulting on behalf of MM Properties. For additional information about the exhibition, please call Kinzelman Art Consulting at 713.533.9923 or visit www.kinzelmanart.com
https://cdn.artcld.com/img/w_400,h_400,c_fit/5emkekk81dvk867cavi5.jpg
Foltz Fine Art
Houston
TX
2019-08-12T00:00:00.0000000
2019-12-13T00:00:00.0000000